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Plastics Today: 6 reasons why predictive modeling benefits packaging design

By: Sumit Mukherjee – Chief Technology Officer of PTI

Wouldn’t it be great if the creative side of the packaging development process could have access to an invisible engineer that could guide the process?  Sound farfetched?  Perhaps, not.

Predictive modeling—part invisible engineer, part crystal ball—is the tool that can take the guesswork out of the design process.  It can ensure design intent and performance criteria are met while still in the virtual space.

1. Design needs to be backed by solid engineering fundamentals.

Creative design is often needed to freshen the brand image. Out of the box thinking is frequently a key component in to enhancing shelf appeal. These design intents need to be backed by proven engineering fundamentals to steer the container shape in a path that is both practicable and robust, while meeting desired performance criteria. Virtual design engineering is your roadmap to success for these challenging endeavors.

2. Narrowing options to the most commercially viable.

Design inputs often turn into a large unmanageable matrix of options that leave the brand owner torn deciding which concepts to invest money for prototyping and testing. Virtual design engineering can not only help screen these multiple, and often complex design choices, but also provides valuable learning resulting in a more robust package.

3. Shorten speed-to-market.

Virtual design engineering provides users with package choices that can be quickly vetted without building expensive molds, fabricating parts and performing exhaustive testing. These virtual tools can facilitate a faster design-to-commercialization process. They will allow you more flexibility and capability to enable quicker decision making that what has been previously available